CEO Stephanie Stuckey at the Stuckey’s Travel Center in Seminole, OK.
Photo: Stephanie Stuckey/Stuckey’s Corp.

The Stuckey’s Travel Center and RV Park in Seminole, OK, is one of the newest Stuckey’s to open since Stephanie Stuckey took over the helm in 2019 and brought her family’s brand back into family hands. And the comeback of the brand couldn’t have come much bigger than this new travel center located just off of Interstate 40 just 50 miles east of Oklahoma City.

Inside the full-service travel center is a food court where you’ll find a Dunkin’, a Baskin Robbins Ice Cream, Turbo Joe’s Fried Chicken, pizza, salads and more including plenty of Stuckey’s famous pecan log rolls, pecan pralines, and pecan divinity  – all available 24-hours a day.

Stuckey’s Travel Center owner Shabaz Raza (l) with brother of CEO Stephanie Stuckey, Scott Stuckey (r).
Photo: Stephanie Stuckey/Stuckey’s Corp.

Here at this Oklahoma oasis, you’ll also find an RV Park with 28 sites, each equipped with 20/30/50 amp electric, sewer, and water hookups. There’s also free WiFi, a propane-refilling station, a laundry, restroom and shower facilities, fire pits, and barbecue grills.

For those traveling a little lighter, they even have cabins that include two queen beds, satellite TV, and free WiFi. Even towels and linens are provided.

So, whether its stocking up on road trip snacks or looking for a place to rest your head for a night or two,   you’ll be glad you made this Stuckey’s stop once you discover all there is to do in the area. Here’s a sampling:

Whipping Tree / Wewoka, OK  

From 1899 to 1907, this pecan tree that stands out in front of the Seminole County Court House was used for public whippings for those guilty of crimes such as arson, perjury, incest, rape and small thefts. Punishment was anywhere from 25 to 100 lashes depending on the crime. At approximately 65 feet high and around 150 years old, the tree still stands today. It even produces pecans, though we don’t imagine they taste so sweet. (23 mi.)

Supersonic Missile / Shawnee, OK  

The granite walls at the Woodland Veterans Park inscribed with the names of every known Oklahoman killed in action since the Spanish-American War. Photo: Ed Bolt / Visit Shawnee – City of Shawnee Department of Tourism

Shawnee’s Woodland Veterans Park is laid out in a five-point star with each point of the star representing a branch of America’s military. Surrounding the star are artifacts from each branch of service including a restored 1965 Bell UH-1D Huey helicopter,  an anchor from the USS Oklahoma that sank in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941,  three 105 MM Howitzers donated by the Oklahoma National Guard  and a USAF AIM-7 Sparrow supersonic air-to-air missile.  Most recently, the park added a ten-panel granite wall inscribed with the names of every known Oklahoman killed in action since the Spanish-American War. All of this makes for some great photo-ops; however, remember that this park was built to honor Oklahoma’s veterans, so approach it with reverence and respect (and don’t climb on the artifacts, please).  (18 Mi.)

This Land was His Land / Okemah, OK

Mural of Woody Guthrie in Okemah, OK. Photo by Uyvsdi – Own work, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Woodrow Wilson Guthrie, the legendary Dust Bowl balladeer who penned such American folk classics as This Land Is Your Land, Roll On, Columbia and about 1,000 others was born here in Okfuskee County’s largest city on July 14, 1912. Woody would spend the first 14 years of his life in what he described as “one of the singingest, square dancingest, drinkingest, yellingest, preachingest, walkingest, laughinest, cryingest, shootingest, fist fightinest, bleedingest, gamblingest, gun, club and razor carryingest” towns in all of Oklahoma. (23 mi.)

Nearly 30 years after his death on October 3, 1967, the town finally paid tribute to their native son and today you can see two murals and a statue of Woody Guthrie located on an otherwise empty lot on Okemah’s Broad Street.  

While you’re in town, head over to Ash and S. 8th Streets for a selfie with Okemah’s other famous landmarks – the “Hot” and “Cold” water towers next to the town’s newer water tower that was painted with the words “Home of Woody Guthrie” in 1972.

Finally, if you have enough time, make a trip north of town to Road N3770 and see the gravesite of one Barbara Sue Manire who passed away on her 64th birthday in 2005. She is now interred at Highland Cemetery beneath a parking meter on her tombstone that reads “Time Expired”. (23 mi.)

Get Your Kicks on Route 66 / Stroud, OK

What better inspiration to get back on the road than a quote from Dr. Seuss at the Rock Cafe in Stroud, OK?
Photo Stephanie Stuckey/Stuckey’s Corp.

Just a few miles north of the Seminole Stuckey’s is Stroud, Oklahoma and Route 66. Here along this iconic stretch of the Mother Road you’ll find the legendary Rock Café, built during the Dust Bowl by era Roy Rieves starting in 1936 and opened in August 1939. Changing hands only a few times over the years, (and even surviving an F3 tornado in 1999 when  other surrounding business were destroyed) the Rock Café is still serving locals, roadtrippers, family vacationers and everybody else traveling through Oklahoma on America’s Main Street in 2022. (27 mi.)

While you’re in the area, be sure to leave your kicks on Route 66 in one of the famous shoe trees located nearby. (The original one toppled over in 2010, so now the ritual has been moved to other nearby trees.)

Home of the Sucker Day / Wetumka, OK

In 1950, the town Wetumka, Oklahoma, was conned into believing that the circus was coming to town. As you can imagine, both kids and adults alike got excited by the news, so they all came together and started preparing food, cleaning the streets and readying their hotel rooms. Then they waited. And waited. And waited. Somebody must’ve finally said something like, “Folks, I don’t believe that circus is coming, after all. Seems we’re all a bunch of suckers.” However, instead of getting angry about it, the townsfolk decided to turn the day into a festive party and Wetumka’s Sucker’s Day Festival has been an annual event ever since. Look for the 72nd Sucker Day Festival sometime around the end of September in 2022. (36 mi.)

James Garner Statue / Norman, OK

Photo courtesy of getTV where you can still watch James Garner in The Rockford Files every weeknight at 8 ET.

The extremely affable and well-respected actor James Garner was born in Norman, Oklahoma on April 7, 1928. After a brief stint in the Army where he served in the Korean War, he went into acting where he became successful for playing lovable rascals in both film and television. His rugged handsomeness allowed him to play leading man roles in feature films such as The Great Escape, The Americanization of Emily, and Grand Prix. Still, it would be his folksy, underplayed delivery that he used in small screen roles which included the lighthearted Western television series Maverick and the detective drama The Rockford Files that would help Garner skyrocket to fame. Proud of their hometown boy’s celebrity success, the city of Norman would erect a 10-foot-tall bronze statue of the actor as Bret Maverick in his honor. It was unveiled on April 21, 2006 with Garner in attendance. James Garner would continue acting into his 80s when a 2008 stroke forced him to retire. He would pass away on July 19, 2014, in Los Angeles, California at the age of 86. (60 mi.)

As you can see, there are many things to see and do after you’ve made a Stuckey’s stop in Seminole, Oklahoma.  Be sure to check them out on your next road trip through the Sooner State.

Whether it’s Oklahoma or other points north, south, east, or west, what’s a road trip around the country without America’s favorite road trip snack – the Stuckey’s Pecan Log Roll

Now you can get your delicious taste of roadside nostalgia even before you’ve left your driveway with our ½ box Stuckey’s Pecan Log Roll Gift Tin which includes 12 2-oz Stuckey’s pecan log rolls that come in our collectible “Sweet Southern Goodness” tin. 

With its light, fluffy nougat center mixed with maraschino cherries hand dipped in buttery caramel and rolled in fresh Georgia grown pecans, our log rolls are the best you’ll find anywhere…or our name isn’t Stuckey’s. For all of this pecany goodness and more, head over to our website at stuckeys.com and order yours today!

Stuckey’s – We’re Making Road Trips Fun Again!