Stuckey’s of Old Fort is an original Stuckey’s stop located just off Exit 75 of Interstate 40 in Old Fort, North Carolina.  However, even though the building’s iconic sloped roof gives it away as one of our earlier post-WWII mid-century modern era stores, pulling up to the store might make you think it’s a later Stuckey’s Express at first thanks to the local Dairy Queen that sits in the store’s right corner.

Ah, but don’t let that fool you. Rest assured that this Stuckey’s is the real original deal where you can still get all of your favorite Stuckey’s Pecan Log Rolls, pecan pralines, and kitschy state souvenirs right next to your Stackburgers, Dilly Bars, and Peanut Buster Parfaits.

That being said, once you’ve gotten your fill of road side eats (and road trip snacks), why not check out some of these things to see and do while you’re in the area?

Arrowhead Monument / Old Fort, NC

Postcard c. early 20th century.
Public Domain.

Located about three miles west of Stuckey’s in downtown Old Fort, this symbol of peace has been a local landmark for 92 years. On July 27, 1930, over 6,000 spectators watched as artist Marie Nesbitt unveiled her 30-ft. hand-chiseled pink granite arrowhead dedicated to peace between the early pioneers of America and the Native Americans who lived there before them. It’s said that the chiefs of both Cherokee and Catawba tribes even smoked a peace pipe together for the first time in their history to further mark this special occasion.

Andrews Geyser / Old Fort, NC

By Dwalter5 – Own work, CC BY 3.0 via Wikipedia

Named after Colonel Alexander Boyd Andrews, native North Carolinian and president of the Southern Railway Company, Andrews Geyser was built in 1885 and the reasons for it being built were twofold: first, it was constructed as a prominent feature of the Round Knob Hotel that was being built at the same time.  Second, it was built as a tribute to the railroad workers – 120 men in all – who died building the railroad through this dangerous and seemingly impossible to tame landscape.

Unfortunately, after the Round Knob Hotel burnt down in 1903, the fountain fell victim to neglect. That is, until 1911 when an old friend of the Colonel – an affluent New York financier and philanthropist named George Fisher Baker – paid to have the fountain restored. However, since the railroad wouldn’t allow for easement, using the old piping and nozzle of the original, a new fountain was built about 70 yards across Mill Creek where the fountain now sits. The fountain you see today was completely restored and rededicated to Col Andrews once again in 1976.

Billy Graham Statue / Ridgecrest, NC

Bill Graham in 1966.
Image: William K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report collection at the Library of Congress

Visit any European country and you’re bound to find statues of a country’s particular patron saint in every little church hamlet or city cathedral. There’s St. Boniface in Germany. Ireland, of course, has St. Patrick, and Italy has numerous ones, St Francis of Assisi perhaps being the most popular. That being said, it’s really no surprise that America, too, has its own religious icons cast in bronze (and other materials) all around the country.  There’s Jesus of the Ozarks (the tallest Jesus in America), Our Lady of the Rockies (the Tallest Virgin Mary statue) in Montana, and in North Carolina, there’s a nine-foot- tall statue of “America’s preacher”, evangelist Billy Graham.  

Graham was born in Charlotte, North Carolina in 1918 and became an ordained Southern Baptist preacher after graduating from college in 1940 with a degree in Theology. From there he became one of the most prominent religious figures in 20th century America.

A statue of Billy Graham stands at the entrance to the Ridgecrest Conference Center in Ridgecrest, North Carolina. He stands next to a 17-foot-tall cross, wearing a three-piece suit, and, with arms outstretched, clinches the Bible in his left hand. The statue was sculpted by Pastor Terrell O’Brien and donated to LifeWay Christian Resources, then located in Nashville, Tennessee. It stood in front of LifeWay’s headquarters until they decided to move from Nashville to Ridgecrest, taking the statue with them.  However, it really kind of makes more sense that the statue is in Ridgecrest anyway as Graham’s home until his death in 2018 was located in nearby Montreat, North Carolina, just five miles away from the statue’s current location (and 10 miles from Stuckey’s of Old Fort).

Chimney Rock State Park / Chimney Rock, NC

By Jmturner – Own work, Public Domain via Wikipedia

The story of Chimney Rock State Park begins with Dr. Lucius B. Morse who became so infatuated with the now-famous monolith while recovering nearby from tuberculosis that, with the help of his brothers, he bought the 64-acre property for $5,000 which included Chimney Rock and surrounding cliffs.

Over the years, many improvements were made, trails added and even an elevator was added in 1946, taking visitors up to the top for the fantastic view of the surrounding North Carolina countryside. In 2007, the Morse family would eventually sell the tourist attraction to the State of North Carolina who turned it into a state park.   

Today, Chimney Rock State Park features hiking trails for all skill levels, views of the Devil’s Head balancing rock, and Hickory Nut Falls, a 404-foot-high waterfall. However, its most famous feature is still the 315-foot granite monolith named Chimney Rock, still accessible by elevator and still providing beautiful vistas views of the park and surrounding landscape.

Bostic Lincoln Center / Bostic, NC

Sure, it’s a bit of a drive from Stuckey’s of Old Fort, but Lincolnphiles – fans of the16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln – will find the trip to the Lincoln Bostic Center well worth the drive.

Contrary to the story of Lincoln being born in a Kentucky log cabin, the center presents significant evidence that Lincoln was actually born on the shores Puzzle Creek near the present day town of Bostic, North Carolina.

Brian Stansberry, CC BY 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Seems Abe’s mother, Nancy Hanks, was an indentured servant working for the Abraham Enlow family when she gave birth to little Abe before eventually moving to Kentucky and marrying Tom Lincoln while Abe was still an infant.

However, don’t just take our word for it. Go take a look at the evidence and decide for yourself. And before you go, be sure to make arrangements to take a walk up to Lincoln Hill – the traditional birthplace of Abraham Lincoln. Visit the center’s website here for contact information and hours.

So there you have a handful of sights to visit after stocking up on Stuckey’s pecan treats and grabbing a few souvenirs for the folks back home. Of course, with Asheville, North Carolina only 24 miles away from Stuckey’s Old Fort, there’s still plenty more to see and do nearby. Let us know some of your favorites.

And speaking of favorites, don’t forget you can stock up on some of your favorite road trip snacks from Stuckey’s just in time for your summer family vacation by ordering from our website. In fact, right now you can take advantage of our latest gift box deal – the “Welcome to Summer” Gift Box – to bring along on your next road trip. This seasonal gift box includes:

2 – 2 oz. Pecan Log Rolls

2 – 1.7 oz Pecan Divinity

2 – 1.5 oz. Pecan Pralines

1 – 12 oz. Salt Water Taffy

1 – 8 oz. Hunkey Dorey

1 – 4 oz. Sea Salt Pecans

1 – 4 oz. Kettle Glazed Pecans  

1 – Candy Shoppe Coffee Mug

 and a Plush 12″ Squirrel to keep you company if you’re traveling alone.

For more on how you can get your Welcome to Summer gift box and other pecan treats and road trip snacks for your next road trip down America’s highways, visit us at www.stuckeys.com.

Stuckey’s – We’re Making Road Trips Fun Again!