Back when Stuckey’s had stores from coast-to-coast, its northernmost store was located just outside of Tokio, Washington, where they sold pecan log rolls at a latitude of 47.2096.

Stuckey’s fan Dave Stewart is excited to be in Stuckey’s northernmost store located in North Stonington, CT.
Image courtesy of Mr. Stewart.

The building that housed the former Stuckey’s still stands along Interstate 90 today about 50 miles southwest of Spokane, Washington.  However, nowadays they “roll” a little differently just outside of Tokio as the former Stuckey’s is now a cannabis shop. Still, this has us wondering – Does this also make it the “highest” former Stuckey’s in America?

Nevertheless, today, the title of the “Northernmost Stuckey’s” goes to the store in North Stonington, Connecticut at 41.44 latitude. Though it’s really a store-within-a-store inside the Pilot Travel Center, that only means that roadtrippers and family vacationers who live north of the Mason-Dixon line don’t have to drive all the way south to get their next Stuckey’s Pecan Log Roll fix.

And while you’re there in Stonington stocking up on Stuckey’s road trips snacks, here are a few places you can see on your way to and from:

Ruth Buzzi’s Park Bench / Westerly, RI

Plaque at the Ruth Buzzi Bench.
Image courtesy Jae Robinson via Facebook

Gen-Xers will most likely remember Ruth Buzzi from the Sid and Marty Krofft Saturday morning live-action comedy The Lost Saucer where she played hapless alien “Fi” to Jim Nabors’ alien “Fum”. However, most people likely know her from Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In TV show. It’s there that Ms. Buzzi played the iconic spinster Gladys Ormphby who was always sitting on a park bench with her drab clothes, her unfriendly demeanor, and her hairnet knotted in the middle of her forehead. She was also famous for using her purse to hit park perverts (and pretty much everyone else she disagreed with). So, it’s no wonder that the city where she was born would honor Ms. Buzzi with her very own park bench. (According to Ms. Buzzi herself, there’s also another one dedicated to her in Burbank, California.) However, this one can be found in Wilcox Park located in nearby Westerly, Rhode Island. (6 mi.)

Mrs. Potato Head Statue / Westerly, RI

Mrs. Potato Head.
Image courtesy of massholemommy.com

In 2000, the state of Rhode Island decided to adopt Mr. Potato Head as its official travel ambassador (Hasbro, the makers of every American kid’s favorite toy spud, is headquartered in Providence, the state’s capital). As a result, the state went so far as to commission several 6-foot-tall Mr. Potato Head statues that were decorated by different artists and placed in many different tourist destinations throughout the Ocean State. However, thanks to the weather, a few vandals, and some them even being sold to private collectors, there are only a scant few left of the original 37. Still, you’re in luck! One of them is just a short drive away from the Stonington Stuckey’s location. So go ahead and swing by 56 Airport Road in Westerly to pose with this fancy mosaic Mrs. Potato Head. Known as “Sunbaked 1966”, she comes complete with bedazzled swimsuit, sunglasses and sandals. (8 mi.)

Snoopy Rock / Preston, CT

If you can’t get enough selfies next to rocks painted to look like dogs, there’s one that’s painted to look like Charlie Brown’s famous beagle about 4 miles away from Spotty on Brickyard Road. Speaking of the world’s favorite zig-zag-striped-shirt-wearing blockhead, Good Ol’ Charlie Brown stands next to Snoopy Rock so you can’t miss it. (18 mi.)

St. Edmund’s Severed Arm / Mystic, CT

Born in Abingdon, England, on November 30, 1180, Edmund Rich eventually became archbishop of Canterbury until he got himself involved an argument between King Henry III and the Roman Catholic Church. As a result, he resigned his position and moved to France where he spent the remainder of his life. He died in Soissons, on November 16, 1240. He was later canonized as a saint sometime around 1246 or 1247, and his tomb became a pilgrimage site and where many had witnessed miracles there.

J.W. Ocker from oddthingsiveseen.com and Edmund’s Severed Arm.
Image courtesy of Mr. Ocker.

Fast-forward to the 19th century when followers of Edmund (known as Edmundites) were forced out of France. At the time, the Reverend Jean Baptiste Muard (caretaker of Edmund’s tomb) knew he couldn’t take the whole body with him out of France. Knowing that Edmund’s arm had been detached from the body for quite awhile, Muard grabbed it and fled to England, eventually ending up in Mystic, Connecticut. Today, you can view that very mummified arm sticking out of a red sleeve in the Chapel of Our Lady of Assumption at Saint Edmund’s Retreat in Mystic. (And, no, you can’t touch it because it’s in a glass case all its own.) (14 mi.)

Spotty the Rock Dog / Preston, CT

Spotty is a painted dog that sits on the side of Route 165/Shetucket Turnpike about a half-mile west of Preston Veterans Memorial School. Spotty was originally painted in 1935 by Stanley Zigtorac and seems to be regularly maintained ever since. This is a quiet area of the road which makes it a great selfie spot. The road also has a speed limit of 55 M.P.H., so don’t blink, or you just might miss it. (18 mi.)

Mystic Pizza / Mystic, CT

While spending a summer in the mid-80’s writer Amy Jones took notice of the Mystic Pizza sign and wrote a film around it. Mystic Pizza is a film that follows the lives and loves of three unforgettable waitresses the summer after high school in a little town called Mystic. Shot in Mystic and the surrounding area, the film was a big hit in 1988 and helped launch the acting careers of Julia Roberts, Annabeth Gish, Lili Taylor, and Vincent D’Onofrio.

Image courtesy Smerdis – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikipedia Commons

After the film’s success, Mystic Pizza, the restaurant, could hardly keep up with all the customers who lined the sidewalks wanting their very own “Slice of Heaven.” The pizzeria is still popular today and their pizza is so good that it’s touted as “the pizza that made the movie famous”. Stop and try “a little slice of heaven” for yourself. (13 mi.)

Of course, there’s so much more to see and do around Stuckey’s in North Stonington, Connecticut, so follow us on social media and let us know some of your favorite places to visit when you’re in the area.

And speaking of Heaven, what’s more divine than a bite of the melt-in-your-mouth deliciousness of Georgia pecans baked in a light and fluffy Southern nougat that we call the Stuckey’s Divinity Bars? For a limited time only, choose from our  24-count box of 1.7-oz Divinities, our 12-count box of 1.7-oz. Divinities, or our 6-count box of 4-oz. Divinities and take $5 off each box! Visit stuckeys.com and order yours today.

Stuckey’s – We’re Making Road Trips Fun Again!

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