It’s the holiday season, which means, among other things, you’ll find millions of people around the world hanging stockings from their fireplace mantels (or reasonable facsimiles thereof), anticipating the arrival of jolly ol’ Saint Nick. It’s a Christmas tradition that’s been carried on for generations. In fact, it’s as old as Saint Nicholas himself.

The Socks and the Saint

There once was a nobleman living in Myre — a coastal Mediterranean town in Asia Minor known today as Demre, Turkey — who had fallen on hard times. His wife had died young, leaving him to care for their three daughters alone. Around the same time, he also lost all of his money in some bad investments. This meant his daughters would never be married as he would never be able to afford to pay their customary dowry. Even worse, the girls would probably have to turn to other unsavory ways of making money in order for the family to survive.

“Shhh! Don’t tell them that I’m stuffing their stockings full of Stuckey’s treats this year!”
Image: Stuckey’s Corp.

Hearing of the nobleman’s misfortune, a local bishop named Nicholas snuck into the family’s home one night and left some gold coins in the girl’s socks that were hung to dry by the fireplace.  When they woke up the next morning and discovered their socks full of gold, they were ecstatic. The family was saved from a life of destitution. Of course, nobody knew who it was that snuck into the house and left the coins, but they had deep suspicions it was Bishop Nicholas, whom some in the town were now calling “the gift-giver of Myra.”

Being a bishop, Nicholas took a vow of celibacy and never married or had children; however, he loved children and could often be found entertaining those who lived alongside him in his small village. He was a modest man, however, and would often leave presents for children in the darkness of the night to protect his identity. As a result, the children of Myre were told to go to bed early so that they would get a gift from him. Later, because of his good deeds, that young bishop would become Saint Nicholas — though you might know him better as Santa Claus.

By the Chimney with Care

“Gee, I really hope it’s those Stuckey’s socks I asked Santa for.”
Image: Stuckey’s Corp.

Like many of our holiday traditions customs, the hanging of the Christmas stockings came across the Atlantic in the 1800s. In fact, one of the first times the hanging of stockings was ever mentioned was in the 1823 poem A Visit From St. Nicholas, written by American poet Clement Clark Moore. Moore mentions the tradition twice. First, we find in the very beginning of the poem:

“The stockings were hung by the chimney with care…”

He mentions the stockings again after St. Nicholas makes his way inside the house via the chimney:

“He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk…”

Stuff Some Stuckey’s in Your Stockings

Today, hanging stockings continues to be a very special part of getting into the Christmas spirit. They’re also still a great way to dispense small gifts from Santa — like our world-famous Stuckey’s Pecan Log Rolls and Stuckey’s Kettle Glazed, Maple, and Sea Salt Pecans.

Buy one pair and we’ll send you a second pair of our choosing absolutely FREE. (Offer expires December 17, 2021.)

However, along with Stuckey’s sweet treats this year, good boys and girls are hoping that Santa will stuff their stockings full of Stuckey’s Sweets for the Feets. Now you and the fam can rock the sweetest socks on the block (or on TikTok) with our newest Stuckey’s road-sign socks. Order them by the pair or get all six in their very own Stuckey’s sampler gift box.

For socks and other great gift ideas from Stuckey’s, go to stuckeys.com or stuckeysgifts.com … and be sure to order by December 14 for Christmas delivery!

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