A few days ago we published an article here on the Stuckey’s Pecan Blog Roll about some of America’s haunted highways. After all of that traveling and searching for all sorts of boogeymen and beasts that haunt America’s highways, we thought you’d like to rest your pretty little head (attached to the rest of your body, of course) at one of these ghoulishly delightful haunted hotels.

The Stanley HotelEstes Park, Colorado

stanleyhotel.com

The haunted hotel that launched a thousand haunted hotels (at least in Hollywood), The Stanley Hotel is best known as The Shining hotel made famous in the book and film written by Stephen King’s. Apparently one night was enough for the author to be spirited away by the inspiringly haunted atmosphere. Built in 1909, the hotel used to offer cars and servants to the traveling elite, some of whom still remain here, shall we say, in spirit. You would think that the hotel would want to keep any tales of ghostly sightings hush-hush, but the Stanley actually embraces it. The guest don’t seem to mind, either. In fact, many of them come just to experience the haunting sounds of untraceable piano music and maniacal laughter heard throughout the hotel and are attributed to the playful spirits of deceased employees and guests.

Malaga InnMobile, Alabama

malagainn.com


Often referred to as the most haunted hotel in Mobile, Alabama, the inn was originally built in 1862 as two townhouses by two brothers-in-law who presented them as wedding gifts to their sisters. Ghostly tales linger about the place as it’s reported the family is still hanging around.  Still retaining its Civil War era charm the Malaga Inn features 39 private rooms with Victorian furnishings, an outdoor courtyard and the spectre of a woman who likes to swing the chandeliers, turn lights off and on, move furniture around, and pace the balcony of Room 7. 

Omni Mount WashingtonBretton Woods, New Hampshire

omnihotels.com

Check into room 314 at the Omni Mount Washington Resort and you might be spending the night with a princess. The ghost of Carolyn Stickney, dead since 1939, is known to sit on the edge of her four poster bed in the middle of the night – yes, the same bed you’ll be sleeping in. Carolyn (nicknamed by hotel staff as “the Princess” is also famous for “borrowing” some of your things in the middle of night as well. Don’t worry. She brings them back. (“Honey, for the umpteenth time I’m telling you I have no idea how a woman’s hair ended up on my hairbrush!”). The Princess sometimes leaves the room and knocks on the doors of other guests staying at this Mount Washington hotel, too.

Omni Grove Park InnAsheville, NC

groveparkinn.com

According to Omni Grove Park Inn history, back in the 1920s a young woman either leapt or was helped to her untimely death five stories below Room 545 at the Omni Grove Park Inn. Employees and guests, especially children, still report her seeing her 100 years a later. Nicknamed “the Pink Lady”, quite often she appears as a pink mist or as a woman in a flowing pink gown.

The Omni Homestead ResortHot Springs, VA

thehomestead.com

Who knows why the spirits of the hereafter seem to be drawn to the Omni franchise, especially those of the female persuasion? For whatever reason, the Omni Homestead Resort also has its own ghostly tale of a woman who committed suicide in the seemingly too depressing for everybody early 20th century. Seems that her fiancé left her on their wedding day, never to return and ever since that fateful day,  she’s been wandering the 14th floor aimlessly, stopping guests in and employees to ask for the time, ever hopeful her groom will return at the time he said he would. So, if you want a glimpse of her, wear a watch.

Gettysburg HotelGettysburg, Pennsylvania

hotelgettysburg.com

Located in the heart of one of the most haunted cities in America at Lincoln Square, the Gettysburg Hotel’s history certainly reports its fair share of spectral sightings; however, the most popular of the hotel’s ghosts seems be a Civil War nurse named Rachel who can be seen wandering the hotel, opening drawers and removing clothes from your room! Perhaps they’re for the wounded soldiers you’ll also see ghosting up the place at night. Keep your suitcase locked if you want to keep them from wearing that favorite Hawaiian shirt of yours that your wife hates so much.

La Posada de Santa FeSanta Fe, New Mexico

laposadadesantafe.com

Before it became the resort that it is today, the La Posada hotel was the home of a German lady named Julia Staab whose merchant husband built the mansion for her in 1882 and all seemed blissful then. However, as you know, things aren’t’ always what they seem.  In 1896, the couple’s eighth child died soon after it was born sending Frau Julia into a deep depression. She never left her room again. And she’s apparently still there in her bedroom, now Suite 100, seen in wafting orbs of the afterlife. She apparently has a love for baths as well. Guests swear they’ve heard running water in the middle of the night, not only in Suite 100, but throughout the hotel, where water eerily turns on and off. Bring a towel just in case.

 The Mayflower Hotel Washington, District of Columbia
 themayflowerhotel.com

Having opened its doors nearly 100 years ago, of course the Mayflower Hotel is going to have some stories to tell. Perhaps the most haunting of these stories in all of the Mayflower Hotel’s history, however, involves a former President of the United States: Calvin Coolidge.

You see, the Mayflower Hotel hosted the Inaugural Ball of President Calvin Coolidge just two weeks after its opening on February 18, 1925; however, three weeks prior to the inauguration ball, the President-elect’s son, sixteen-year-old Calvin, Jr., developed a blister atop the third toe of his right foot while playing lawn tennis with his brother on the White House grounds. Not too long after, the boy began to feel sick with fever. Young Calvin, Jr. was dead from a staph infection within a week. As a result, the elder Coolidge missed his inaugural ball.

However, to make up for missing out on the celebrations, it’s been said that he comes back every January 20, the anniversary of the ball. Nevertheless, he seems to live up to his moniker as he never says anything, but witnesses claim it’s him causing the lights to flicker at exactly 10 p.m. on that date – the time he was suppose to arrive at the ball! The elevator that was supposed to take him from the 8th floor holding room to the ballroom refuses to move until 10:15, the time he was supposed to enter the ballroom. There’s even that time that plate of elegant hors d’oeuvres were left on the Grand Ballroom’s balcony, yet nothing of the sort had been served that day.

Could it have been silent Cal letting us know he was still ready to receive his inaugural guests? Since this is an election year, why don’t you drive over next January 20 and find out for yourself?

We don’t know about you, but all of this ghost hunting is making us hungry. Good thing we made a couple of stops at the Stuckey’s locations we saw along the way and picked up a few of their newer, bigger 10 ounce Stuckey’s pecan log rolls to help stave off our hunger. We also picked up some of Stuckey’s fine pecan candies for the folks back home who were too scared to do a little ghostbusting with us. They asked us to pick up some t-shirts and caps too. We also grabbed two of their coffee mugs and filled them up with coffee right there in the store to keep us awake for the drive home. (We didn’t sleep so good on this trip).

Anyway, if you’re also too afraid to venture out to do a little ghost hunting this Halloween, why not order some of Stuckey’s famous pecan log rolls or other fine pecan candies delivered right to the comfort and safety of your own home? And don’t forget, with the holidays coming, Stuckey’s merchandise makes great gifts for family and friends. Find out more at stuckeys.com.