For over 80 years, Stuckey’s has been a part of the roadside experience for generations of travelers. Our customers have visited our stores throughout the country and have had incredible and exciting experiences that have created fond memories years later.

Our guestbook is your opportunity to share those experiences with others!  Please feel free to post your comments in our guestbook for others to see and share! We very much appreciate your patronage!  If by chance you have pictures of your Stuckey’s visits, please post them to our Facebook page, we would love for everyone to share your experience!

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Mickey from Red Oak, TX wrote on June 19, 2020
Wow! I have quite a connection to Stuckey's as they were a very big part of my life. (Some of this is to the best of my recollection and may not be in the exact order.) My dad, as a carpenter and cabinet maker, was employed in the very early '60s for work on the Merkel. TX store. After working on stores in Big Spring and Strawn, TX, and with previous experience as a building contractor. he was hired as a building superintendent for Stuckey's and was assigned the Round Rock, TX store. From there he built stores in Waxahachie and Monroe, LA and Monument, CO (I worked with him a short while on this one). Then I went with him in the summer of 1965 to build the Norlina, NC store. From there he went to Tonkawa, OK, Kearney, NE, Anthony, TX, Deming, NM, and Strasburg, CO. I went to work for him again on the Seibert, CO store in the spring of '68 and in the summer, we trekked to Kalamazoo, MI. I left there to go to NC for work and school, while he went on to Yuma, AZ. It was during construction at this store that he suffered a fatal heart attack in January of '69. I'll always remember working on the stores with him and setting them up and remaining through grand openings. Some may not know or have forgotten that, since these stores were built out away from major cities, they had really nice quarters in the rear where the store managers lived. Daddy always made sure "his" stores and these living spaces were done right and to exacting standards. Nothing but the best for Stuckey's. Although they no longer carry the Stuckey name, some of these buildings are still standing, including one just... Read more
Wow! I have quite a connection to Stuckey's as they were a very big part of my life. (Some of this is to the best of my recollection and may not be in the exact order.) My dad, as a carpenter and cabinet maker, was employed in the very early '60s for work on the Merkel. TX store. After working on stores in Big Spring and Strawn, TX, and with previous experience as a building contractor. he was hired as a building superintendent for Stuckey's and was assigned the Round Rock, TX store. From there he built stores in Waxahachie and Monroe, LA and Monument, CO (I worked with him a short while on this one). Then I went with him in the summer of 1965 to build the Norlina, NC store. From there he went to Tonkawa, OK, Kearney, NE, Anthony, TX, Deming, NM, and Strasburg, CO. I went to work for him again on the Seibert, CO store in the spring of '68 and in the summer, we trekked to Kalamazoo, MI. I left there to go to NC for work and school, while he went on to Yuma, AZ. It was during construction at this store that he suffered a fatal heart attack in January of '69.
I'll always remember working on the stores with him and setting them up and remaining through grand openings. Some may not know or have forgotten that, since these stores were built out away from major cities, they had really nice quarters in the rear where the store managers lived. Daddy always made sure "his" stores and these living spaces were done right and to exacting standards. Nothing but the best for Stuckey's. Although they no longer carry the Stuckey name, some of these buildings are still standing, including one just a few miles down I-35 from me.